Doctor Who Magazine #515 is Tom Spilsbury’s Last as Editor

All good things must come to an end, and that’s true, today, of Doctor Who Magazine – as Tom Spilsbury’s tenure as editor comes to a close this month.

Tom Spilsbury, editor since August 2007, is stepping down from his position after publication of DWM #515 (on sale Thursday 27 July 2017), and will be replaced by Marcus Hearn, a long-standing writer for DWM, who also previously co-edited the title in the 1990s, and has recently been the editor of the title’s Special Editions and the spin-off bookazine series, The Essential Doctor Who.

Tom Spilsbury said:

“After 10 years as editor of Doctor Who Magazine, it’s time for a change – both for me, and for the magazine. As the newly regenerated Second Doctor said in The Power of the Daleks, way back in 1966, ‘Life depends on change and renewal’, and I’ve made it a policy to always pay attention to my Doctor. Of course, it’s been a very difficult decision for me, to give up a job that I love so much.

“DWM has always been a part of my life – virtually my earliest memory of life on this planet was of my Dad buying a copy of issue 1 for me, way back in 1979, when I was just three years old. It was 2003 when I got the job of a lifetime as DWM’s assistant editor, and four years later, I finally got the top job. It’s been simply amazing to have had the honour to be producing the magazine over such a successful and eventful decade in Doctor Who’s history. However, having taken charge of 129 editions, including the 400th and 500th issues, it’s time for someone else to have a go in the driver’s seat. Marcus Hearn is a brilliant editor, and DWM is the greatest magazine in the galaxy. I’m so looking forward to being able to read it each month without already knowing what’s going to be in it! And I truly hope that I’ll still be around in the year 2054 to enjoy issue 1000, even if it’s beamed directly into our heads by then…”

Marcus Hearn added:

“This magazine is unique, and it’s a unique honour to be entrusted with it. We’re all grateful to Tom for his unparalleled dedication. I’d like to build on his achievements, and I can’t wait to start working with my colleagues at Panini. A new chapter is about to begin for the television series, and this will be a new chapter for DWM too.”

Finally, Mike Riddell, Managing Director of Panini UK, concluded:

“Tom’s contribution to the magazine over the past 14 years has been immense and we will miss his passion and knowledge of the brand which is second to none. Marcus brings a fresh approach to the magazine as well as a wealth of experience in magazine publishing.”

There’s no news as to where Tom will move onto, but suffice to say, he’ll be missed. Nonetheless, we look forward to Hearn’s time at the helm of the good ship DWM!

Doctor Who Magazine #515 is on sale from Thursday 27 July, 2017, price £5.99.

  • Marcus Hearn is an excellent choice. He’s rather more cerebral in his approach; I’ve always enjoyed his writing. Excellent on analysis, too, and he’s something of an SF and horror scholar. (I rhymed!) Hope there’s less fawning adulation of everything the new series does under his editorship; I appreciate DWM has got to keep in with the BBC, but praising everything they do to the skies, especially when a story is no more than mediocre, is very, very dull. The glory days of DWM were under Gary Gillett’s wry and witty eye. I’m sure Marcus will be great.

    • Christian Cawley

      I’d largely agree. While Tom has clearly steered the magazine to new heights, there was a feeling of it trying to be everything to everyone. I think it did better in recent years, however, with more classic-era features, so Mr Spilsbury certainly goes out on a high!

    • Turdformers 6: Age of Dog Mess

      Yeah, the obsequious quality of their reviews, even for spin off media like Big Finish and novels, really gets on my nerves. But I have to say that it is one of my few criticism of the magazine. Generally speaking I think it has been of excellent quality and I don’t mind the focus on the new stuff. Classic Who is hardly forgotten, but it is well the past now. We can no more expect it to be the dominant focus any more than a Star Trek magazine being predominantly about the original series.