Christmas 2017 Gift Guide: Paperback Books

We’ve tackled the hardback books so in the spirit of ignoring eBooks, we’re now going to take you to a magical place where books are a little lighter, a little cheaper, and a little bit special – it’s the Christmas gift guide for Doctor Who paperback books!

Dr. Twelfth. Originated by Roger Hargreaves. Written and Illustrated by Adam Hargreaves.

Yes, we’re going back to the Dr. Men because it happens to be a beautifully coloured, charming little well that everybody should visit. In what is the greatest mash-up since Alf met the cast of Gilligan’s Island, it’s Doctor Who meets the world of Roger Hargreaves in these fabulous little adventures featuring each individual Doctor draw in the disarming style of the Mr Men.

Why Dr. Twelfth? Well, it’s my personal favourite and it seems fitting to celebrate the Twelfth Doctor’s reign as we get ready to say goodbye to him this Christmas. But seriously, they’re all well worth picking up for that little Doctor Who fan in your life.

Now, because I’m so good to you, here’s a video of Missy herself, Michelle Gomez reading Dr. Twelfth.

Doctor Who: Paper Dolls by Simon Guerrier & Christel Dee.

There’s a long list of things that Christmas wouldn’t be Christmas without, so, in the fine tradition of inflating the importance of some little thing because if we concede just one aspect of Christmas the whole edifice will come crashing around us like some hastily assembled supermarket grotto, Christmas wouldn’t be Christmas without a novelty book.

This years Doctor Who: Dot to Doc (Boo! Boo that pun!) is Doctor Who: Paper Dolls, which capitalises on the rich seam of Doctor Who fans who are also into paper dolls by forcing them to acknowledge both hobbies in one book.

Whether you’re look for a rainy-day activity to entertain your children – who should be supervised as you need a sharp pair of scissors to cut out your collection of Doctors, companions and foes – or you just want some handy ideas about how to cosplay as your favourite characters (sadly I’m out of luck as there’s very little on King Yrcanos) this is the book for a craft-happy Doctor Who fan. Plus the illustrations by Ben Morris are superb.

Lethbridge-Stewart: The Forgotten Son by Andy Frankham-Allen

Christmas is both the perfect time to get reacquainted with old friends and to make new ones. So, in that spirit of charging ahead into new ventures with old friends why not give Candy Jar Books Lethbridge-Stewart novels – which follows on from the events of The Web of Fear, fleshing out just what happened to the likes of Harold Chorley, Anne Travers and, of course, Alistair Lethbridge-Stewart after their horizons were expanded in unexplained and fantastic ways – to that difficult to buy for Whovian who has everything and demands more. More!

The whole series is worth your time but, as with most things in life, the beginning is a good place to start.

When the DWC reviewed The Forgotten Son, Christian Cawley said:

“I’m reluctant to issue empty epithets such as “a triumph” or “Andy Frankham-Allen’s best yet!” (especially as I haven’t read too much of Andy’s work) but The Forgotten Son is the series opener that we hoped for, and we further hope the range continues for many years to come.”

And it did…

Whoblique Strategies Edited by Elton Townend Jones.

How about a Christmas gift that gives a little something back?

Released on the 54th anniversary of Doctor Who, Wholique Strategies, an anthology of fast fiction based around Brian Eno and David Bowie’s creativity-firing oblique strategy cards, which encouraged the user to think outside of the box, which in Bowie’s case, resulted in two of his best albums; Low and Heroes.

Here, the result is 70 writers – including DWC contributors Christian Cawley, James McLean, Jon Arnold and my fellow editor Philip Bates – covering 16 Doctors, and a whole new adventure across the history of everyone’s favourite Time Lord.

What’s more, the proceeds from the book go to Children in Need. Everyone’s a winner!

The Black Archive 12: Pyramids of Mars by Kate Orman.

What better gift to give to the Doctor Who fan in your life than the chance to see the serials they love in a completely new light?

Crack the spin on any one of The Black Archive books and you’ll be treated to a detailed, fascinating and entertaining look at every story in Doctor Who’s history.  Building on the rich storytelling of the Doctor Who universe, each short book aims to continue the conversation between fans and the show they love in an authoritative, critical but accessible way.

Each volume is worth buying but my favourite volume is Pyramids of Mars. While Orman’s discussion of Egyptian mythology goes fairly in-depth, it never strays too far from the interplay between myth and the story being told – which then springboards off into a wider discussion on Pyramids of Mars and its place in the Doctor Who canon.

Wrong! Everything here is wrong! No one wants that for Christmas! What are your suggestions for ideal Doctor Who gifts for the booklover in your life? Let us know in the comments below.