BBC Inspired by Doctor Who to Embrace “A Whole Generation of Female Stories”

Following the positive reception for Jodie Whittaker’s debut The Woman Who Fell to Earth, the BBC have pledge to bring more female stories and experiences to the small screen.

Speaking at the Steve Hewlett Memorial Lecture the BBC’s Director of Content, Charlotte Moore promised to increase the amount of drama produced by female writers – which has already doubled over the past two years.

She said:

“45% of the dramas we’ve commissioned at the BBC in the last two years are from female writers… It’s not 50:50, yet, but it’s more than double where we were in the past… [we’re] just at the start of a very long journey to address a huge historical failing of female voices

“There’s a whole generation of female stories, perspectives and experiences that’s coming to the surface. It’s our responsibility to make that generation heard – and help them inspire a new generation in turn”.

Moore went on to cite the response to Jodie Whittaker’s performance as the Doctor – and in particular, one little girls’ reaction to her unveiling – as vindication for more prominent female led dramas.

She added:

“I defy anyone who saw that viral video of the little girl, waiting for the new Doctor Who to be unveiled – who witnessed the expression on her face when she shouted: ‘The new doctor is a girl’ – not to think we’ve done something good and inspirational”.

Moore also went on to champion authentic British voices in drama, challenging the rise of streaming services like Netflix and Amazon, whose massive budgets don’t always go towards go towards getting new British stories told.

Doctor Who returns this Sunday with The Ghost Monument at 6:55 pm on BBC One.