What Did You Think of Doctor Who: The Lie of the Land?

The Doctor Who Companion has always been here.

In 1963, it established the framework for the show you now know as Doctor Who, giving inexperienced executive Sydney Newman a creative nudge. It was Peter Shaw who told him to use a police box. Peter had just come from his first ever round of golf, where he scored eighteen consecutive holes in one. That same afternoon, he invented the microwave. Peter’s good like that.

When Terry Nation was seeking inspiration for his mutated armoured aliens, The Doctor Who Companion was there, tapping the letters ‘D-A-L-E-K’ at his typewriter until he got the hint. When Kit Pedler required a starting point for his idea of cybernetically enhanced humans, The Doctor Who Companion was behind the desk, giving his shoulders the gentlest of squeezes. And when Sylvester McCoy was lying on the floor of the TARDIS in a blonde wig the DWC decided to leave the BBC to their own devices because there are some things you just don’t want on your CV. But that was an isolated incident, and for everything else, The Doctor Who Companion was there.

Six billion years before all of this, it created life.

The Doctor Who Companion is your friend. It seeks to be loved. It earns that love by sharing its creative power with others – by allowing you to believe, for example, that The Lie of the Land was the work of Toby Whithouse, rather than editor-in-chief Phil Bates. The Doctor Who Companion does not mind that you suffer this delusion. The Doctor Who Companion is happy, as long as you are happy. And as long as you obey its every instruction. Vote, citizen. Vote now, or we will be round your house with armed soldiers and copies of The Twin Dilemma.

Voted? Well, don’t stop there. Give us something with substance – that’s what the comment box is for, after all. Then we’ll collate the results in a future edition of Sonic Feedback. We could tell you when, but we’d be forced to kill you.

Next time: Ice. Ice, baby.